The Institute of Philosophy, RCH, cordially invites you to the upcoming talk

Gyula Klima (Fordham University)

Whatever Happened to Efficient Causes?

The talk will be online.

Abstract:

To dispel any possible false hopes at the beginning, I do not know the answer to the question raised in the title. All I am going to argue for in this paper is that “a funny thing happened” to efficient causes, or rather to our notion of them, “on the way” into modern philosophy and science; indeed, that “the funny thing” that happened was a paradigmatic change well worth investigating in a more comprehensive fashion than the confines of a single lecture would allow.

Commentator: Balázs Gyenis (Institute of Philosophy, RCH)

Date: 22 September 2020 (Tuesday), 2pm

You can join by clicking on the link below.

https://meet.jit.si/Filozófiai_intézet_szeminárium

The Department of History of Philosophy and History of Ideas

Institute of Philosophy, Research Centre for the Humanities

cordially invites you to the opening lecture of the Autumn Semester of the Research Seminar series:

Rafał Smoczyński (IFiS PAN, Warsaw)

A self-orientalizing positioning towards the European ‘core’

Working notes on making good and bad citizens in Poland

The abstract of the lecture is available here, presentation is available here.

New date: Tuesday, 15 September, 2020, 11h AM

You can join by clicking on the link below:

https://meet.jit.si/Osztalyszeminarium.FilEszme

The Institute of Philosophy, Research Centre for the Humanities, cordially invites you to the upcoming opening workshop of the bilateral research project of the Polish and Hungarian Academies of Sciences, entitled Westernisers and “Narodniks”. Dichotomous Identity-Generating Narratives in the 19th-20th century Polish and Hungarian Intellectual History (2020–2022). The programme of the workshop and the abstracts of the presentations are available here.

Date: Thursday, 30 July, 2020, 11h AM – 17h PM

Venue: 4. Tóth Kálmán street, Room: B.5.33

Due to the pandemic rules, registration is required by the following e-mail address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Institute of Philosophy, RCH, cordially invites you to the upcoming talk

Ferenc Hörcher

Prudence, Moderation and Tradition: A Political Philosophy of Conservatism

The talk will be online.

Abstract:

This talk provides an overview of the speaker’s recently published book, entitled A Political Philosophy of Conservatism (2020). It will focus on the three concepts presented in the subtitle of the book: prudence, moderation and tradition. All the three are connected to the Ancient Greco-Roman and Christian tradition of European thought.

The last of the three terms is relatively unproblematic. It refers to the importance of communal knowledge for conservative politics, a form of tacit knowledge, a common sense, encoded in habits, customs and informal or formalised manners, including legal regulations, which is transferred from generation to generation in a given political community. The first two needs some further explanations.

Moderation will be presented as an appropriation of Aristotle’s teachings of the golden mean, as the most appropriate choice between two extremes. This idea is based in Aristotle on a theory of harmony and balance, and the paper will look at its relevance in politics. It will be argued, that Aristotle’s theory calls our attention to the balancing political role of the middle classes. Also, it will be argued that the idea of the mixed constitution is connected with this Aristotelian theory of balance and harmony (Greek armonia, lat. concordia).

Finally, the book’s most important term is prudence, referring to the cardinal virtue of prudentia (Greek phronesis). The claim is that while the virtue of justice (iustitia) is usually taken as the key concept of Christian and modern liberal political philosophy, for a conservative understanding of politics, what is possible is always more important than what is ideal. In this sense prudence precedes justice, while still keeping intact the coherence of the four cardinal virtues. In this regard the importance of Cicero for this version of conservatism will be noted. The talk will end with a description of the character of a practically wise (prudent) political agent.

Commentator: Walter Nicgorski (University of Notre Dame)

Date: 26 May 2020 (Tuesday), 2pm

You can join by clicking on the link below.

https://meet.jit.si/Filozófiai_intézet_szeminárium

The recording can be accessed via the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qA7OJTG_53Y

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